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What are some little known ways to keep your car in good shape as you add on many miles?

I’m not sure any of this is “little known”, but regular awareness can make a log term difference.

Park carefully: pull up to curb carefully to preserve alignment, watch those side curbs to avoid wheel rim rash, and pick your spot carefully to avoid door dings.

Keep in mind - paint doesn’t get much damage when cars get dirty. Paint gets most of it’s damage when it gets cleaned. (and direct sunlight)

Don’t use automatic car washes unless they are “touchless”.

Clean with high pressure sprayer before using anything like sponge and rags, which can damage paint with what the sprayer doesn’t remove.

Use the “spot free” rince at the spray car wash for the final rinse - it removes things like calcium in what would otherwise be “hard” water.

Use a mild car-wash detergent after spraying off all you can, and apply low hand pressure and use soft cloths which will help avoid paint damage.

Wash (spray, and by hand) from the top down. Consider a throw-away cloth for the very lowest door/rocker panels and the lowest part of the bumper covers.

Don’t re-use wash cloths or towels until they have been washed in a washing machine.

Use a good wax annually (twice annually if kept parked outdoors during the day), but wax it only after it is throughlly cleaned (consider clay bar for cleaning).

Avoid sharp objects in your hands or rear pockets, or be careful with ingress/egress.

Lift your feet when getting in or out to spare scuffing the thresholds.

Change Oil and other fluids reasonably close to on schedule (Oil is OK for 5–8K miles, IMHO). That includes periodic cooling system and brake system flush.

Don’t use regular water in the windsheild washer system - it will calcify and cause problems.

Take it as easy as you can after a cold-start, which is when most engine wear occurs.

Replace shocks/struts on schedule or at the first sign of failure.

Replace rubber bushings in suspension ad steering linkage at the first sign of “clunkiness”, usually at about 100K miles.

Pick routes that involve somewhat less start/stop, less turning, less gear shifting.

Treat rubber parts periodically with rubber treatment - and that’s not just Armor All type, but penetrating rubber treatment liquid/gel.

Check for leaks. Not so much minor seepage, but leaks that leave oil or transmission fluid where you park.

And finally, don’t be disapointed that this will have litle impact on resale value, but you and your passengers will likely enjoy something that seems almost new.

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